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Recent Blog Posts
 

  1. California's Split-Shift Law - A Quick Overview
    04 Apr, 2018
    California's Split-Shift Law - A Quick Overview
    The California Labor Code requires an employer to pay an employee promptly upon termination, whether voluntary (i.e. quitting) or involuntary (i.e. firing), with at least 72-hour notice.  If an employer fails to do so, the employee may be entitled to Waiting Time Penalties for every day he or she has to wait for payment.
  2. FIRED, BUT NOT PAID?
    28 Nov, 2017
    FIRED, BUT NOT PAID?
    The California Labor Code requires an employer to pay an employee promptly upon termination, whether voluntary (i.e. quitting) or involuntary (i.e. firing), with at least 72-hour notice.  If an employer fails to do so, the employee may be entitled to Waiting Time Penalties for every day he or she has to wait for payment.
  3. MEAL BREAK BASICS - THE CALIFORNIA STANDARD
    10 Nov, 2017
    MEAL BREAK BASICS - THE CALIFORNIA STANDARD
    The California Labor Code is often touted as being very pro-employee.  This is not a bad thing. California employers have a duty to conform their practices to laws intended to protect workers’ interests. This includes providing employees with proper meal breaks in a timely manner.
  4. DO YOU NEED A DAY TO REST? THE CALIFORNIA LABOR CODE SAYS - YES!
    12 Oct, 2017
    DO YOU NEED A DAY TO REST? THE CALIFORNIA LABOR CODE SAYS - YES!
    The California Supreme Court has interpreted the California Labor Code’s "Day of Rest” law to ensure employees working in excess of 6 hours in a day and 30 hours in a workweek are not being required to work 7 days straight - assuming a Sunday - Saturday workweek.